Booking Film & Camera Equipment With Booking Software

Booking Film & Camera Equipment With Booking Software

Equipment booking software allows you to check out film and camera equipment to your colleagues or clients. Overall, this creates a clear audit trail of where your assets are going and where they’ve been, as well as who they’ve been with.

You can track your cameras as a single, unique asset and you can track any other equipment that is relevant to the booking, such as shotgun mics and other, smaller bits of kit.

Then, you can create pdfs of the checked out equipment so that you can send on a sheet and verify that the equipment has been received and is with the client.

Why You Need Construction Equipment Asset Management Tools


How Does Equipment Booking Software Work?

Equipment booking software is a set of functionality within asset tracking software suites. Asset tracking software allows you to track unique assets and their information.

As such, you can add each of your cameras as a unique asset and add any relevant costing and purchasing information. One of the benefits of this is that when you’re using equipment booking software, you can also track your assets in other ways and you can expand your operations to include IT assets for example.

The concept of tracking cameras as unique assets means that you can create a specific audit trail related to that singular asset. Then, you can use helpful booking features to check this asset out to individuals or companies.


Speeding Up Bookings With Asset Tags

The best thing about using asset tracking software and booking equipment functionality is that you get an integrated asset tracking app.

This asset tracking app means that you can tag your assets with unique QR codes and barcodes and use these for speedy asset tracking processes.

In practice, this means that you can book out assets when you’re physically close to them in an instant. Simply scan the assets’ tags and press “book asset”, then set the dates.

This gives your team the possibility to share responsibilities, too, as anyone can be given access to your asset tracking system and, therefore, can be given the necessary permissions to book and check assets out.


Reports And Exporting Booking Information

Once you’ve created a booking, you can also put an asset into a location, marking it as either checked out or with a specific client. This gives you a clear record of where your assets are in the world.

Adding an asset to a location also creates an automated record of how long the asset is in that location for. This gives you two complementary bits of information: How long the asset is due to be booked out for and how long the asset is actually booked for.

All of this is pulled into a dedicated reports page where you can filter by any and all asset fields. Therefore, you can create a filter of all the assets one client has, export it as a pdf and send it to them alongside the equipment, ready for them to sign to verify receipt.


itemit’s Asset Tracking Software

itemit’s asset tracking software gives you all of this and more. itemit is scalable and shareable which allows you to use it for anything within your business.

itemit gives you effective equipment booking software capabilities, allowing you to manage your film and camera equipment check outs. Therefore, itemit provides you with visibility and accountability where there otherwise wouldn’t be any.

You can use different tracking technologies with itemit, too. You can use GPS trackers, RFID asset tags, QR codes and barcodes, or all of these in tandem, to create the most visibility, control and transparency possible over your asset register.

To find out more about how itemit can help your crew, you can contact the team at team@itemit.com. You can also fill in the form below to start your very own 14-day free trial.

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